1st Day of the Month: Nouminia

This is the ritual for the first day of the new month. The reason that I’m doing a Nouminia ritual is because I like my rituals to run smoothly. Doing this enables for that to happen. Every month I’m going to be doing a ritual for the following Athenian month, which will be written around the time of the Full Moon. I’m doing this so that others can use these rituals and change anything that they might not like.

Hope that this ritual helps.

 

1) Purify the Altar area.

2) Take the barley and say, “As it was done in ancient times. I purify and cleanse this altar with this barley. With this barley I purify this altar and space so that I may give offerings, libations, and speak with glory and respect the gods of Mt. Olympus.”

3) Light a candle and say a hymn to Hestia.

Hestia, you who guard the sacred shrine of the Lord Apollon. The far-darter at goodly Pathos. With soft oil dripping ever from your locks. Come now to this house, come having one mind with Zeus the all wise-draw near, and with all bestow favor upon my song.”

Prayer to Hestia

Hestia, gracious goddess who sits at the heart of each home, who lives in the heart of each one who reveres you, each one who holds you dear, each one who turns to you for strength and harmony.

Hestia, goddess most needful, goddess most serene, goddess most esteemed, the heart of the city is yours as well, great goddess; within your realm are those who serve the state, who work for all the good of all–your blessings fall on the honest, goddess, your wrath on the corrupt, on those who betray their trust for gain. Defender of the householder, guardian of the hearthfire, Hestia, I praise and honor you.

4) Let Hermes know that your here by saying, “Hermes, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles (if you know them) and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

5) Do an Invocation to Hermes

“I call to Hermes, son of thundering Zeus and gracious Maia, fair of face and kind of heart; father of Tyche, granter of serendipity.

In rugged Arcadia, land of your birth, were you well known and praised by one and all; in all the ancient world did you receive honors.

Throughout the land stood herms and mounded stones, at crossroads and at boundaries, in all the far-flung provinces, marking the path and holding your gift of fortune, Far-journeying Hermes, guide of the traveler, fleet-footed god of merchants, god of gamblers and thieves and all who live by wit and while and clever words, master of discretion and finesse.

Hermes, protector of the home, provider of feast and frolic, courier of dreams, kind Hermes, I call to you.”

6) Do a Prayer to Hermes.

Hermes of the ready wit and the lightning smile, wing-footed one who carries the words of the gods, compassionate one who guides the newly-dead to the halls of Hades and fair Persephone, quick-thinking one who takes interest in the world and works of mankind, whose hand we see in the run of luck and a clever scheme, I call to you.

Hermes, bearer of the herald’s staff, your gifts are great.

You guard the homes with constancy and care, you grant to us a portion of your own craft and while, you join with us when we revel and are merry, you stand with us when we are far from home, alone.

You are ever with us, O Hermes; O god who holds in hand the good of men, I honor you.

7) Do the Hymn to Hermes

“I sing of Cyllenian Hermes, Slayer of Argus, lord of Cyllene and Arcadia rich in flocks, luck-bringing messenger of the deathless gods. He was born of Maia, the daughter of Atlas, when she had made love to Zeus,–a shy goddess she. Ever she avoided the throng of the blessed gods and lived in a shadowy cave, and there the Son of Cronos used to lie with the rich-tressed nymph at dead of night, while white-armed Hera lay bound in sweet sleep: and neither deathless god nor mortal man knew it.

And so hail to you, Son of Zeus and Maia; with you I have begun: now I will turn to another song!

Hail, Hermes, giver of grace, guide, and giver of good things!

8) Let Selene know that your here by saying, “Selene, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

 

9) To an Invocation to Selene

“I call to Selene, mistress of the silver moon, sister of the sun, daughter of the elder gods, sky-riding goddess, your white hands firm upon the reins, guiding your pale chariot across the night sky, your eyes like stars, your silken hair as black as night, a shining crescent at your brow.

Kind-hearted goddess, beloved of beautiful Endymion, your light falls ever on lovers’ silent trysts, on kisses sweetly captured, on longed-for embraces.

As well you keep company with mothers in their midnight walks, bringing your comfort to crying babe and weary women alike.

Ever changing one, as you wax and wane do farmers plant their fields, do women count their months, do witches work their spells.

Fair Selene, beacon in the great dark, I honor you.

10) Starry-eyed Selene, whose home is the dusky sky, whose brilliance lights the shadows, driving fear from the souls of men; child of Titans, sister of bright Helios who rules the day as you do the dark of night, your matchless beauty greets us with each setting sun.

Silken-haired goddess, your long black tresses fall like water, your silver carriage courses through the air, your strong hand guides the sturdy oxen that draw it; at your command they soar through clouds and fall beneath the far horizon.

Fair Selene, you shine your light on the midnight traveler, the sleepless lover, the wakeful child.

Wise goddess, friend of those who live by night, friend of the lonely, the waiting, the lost, good Selene, I honor you.

11) And next, sweet voiced Muses, daughters of Zeus, well-skilled in song, tell of the long-winged Moon. From her immortal head a radiance is shown from heaven and embraces earth; and great is the beauty that arises from her shining light. The air, unlit before, glows with the light of her golden crown, and her rays beam clear, whensoever bright Selene having bathed her lovely body in the waters of Ocean, and donned her far-gleaming, shining team, drives on her long-maned horses at full speed, at evening time in the mid-month: then her great orbit is full and then her beams shine brightest as she increases. So she is a sure token and a sign to mortal men.

Once the Son of Cronos was joined with her in love; and she conceived and bare a daughter Pandia, exceeding lovely amongst the deathless gods.

Hail, white-armed goddess, bright Selene, mild, bright-tressed queen! and now I will leave you and sing the glories of men half-divine, whose deeds minstrels, the servants of the Muses, celebrate with lovely lips.

12) Let Apollo know that your here by saying, “Apollo, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles, (if you know them), and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

13) I call to Apollo, radiant and beautiful god, son of fair Leto and lightning wielding Zeus, brother of swift-footed, true shooting Artemis.

In ancient Delphi you lent your wisdom to all, in Delos and in far-off shrines your words did sound; across the land, in all the provinces, Phoebus, were temples raised in your name, did men and women gather in your honor, wreathed in sweet flowers, words of prayer upon their lips.

Many lovers were yours, bright Apollo, and many noble sons and daughters; father of kind Asklepos, your healing hand can cease the most poisonous of plagues. Apollo, we see you in beauty–in art and in song, in the perfection of numbers, in the words of poets, in the drive towards truth.

Apollo, I call to you.

14) Shining Apollo, bright-haired son of Zeus, strong of arm and flawless of form, of all the gods none are your equal in beauty or grace.

Apollo, of Leto were you born on well-favored Delos; in Athens and in Sparta and in all the lands were you honored.

To you did men and women offer prayers for health and healing in days of old; to you did the poets call for inspiration, O leader of the lovely Muses.

Apollo, driver of all ills and evil from the land, in Delphi were you served by the faithful Pythia, with whom you shared your prophecies.

Apollo, never has your glory been forgotten; throughout the centuries have artists turned to you for light and vision.

Great god, I praise you and your gifts.

15) Phoebus, of you even the swan sings with clear voice to the beating of his wings, as he alights upon the bank by the eddying river Peneus; and of you the sweet tongued minstrel, holding his high-pitched lyre, always sings both first and last.

And so hail to you, lord! I seek your favor with my song.

16) Let Zeus know that your here by saying, “Zeus, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles, which is Ktesios (storeroom) and Herkeios (courtyard) and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

17) I call to great Zeus, father of the deathless gods, ruler of bright Olympos, master of storms, child of mighty Kronos and deep-hearted Rhea, consort of blessed Hera of the splendid eyes.

Ancient Zeus, honored in Crete so long ago and well known in high-reaching Arcadia, all-knowing Zeus of Dodona and Didyma whose wisdom was granted to seekers of old, Zeus of the broad sky, Zeus of the marketplace, Zeus of the householder, Zeus of the city.

Protector of the just, avenger of the wronged, friend of the stranger and of the traveler, friend of the guest and the generous host.

Zeus whose eye is ever on the world, whose hand is ever in our lives, great Zeus, I call to you.

18) Father Zeus, defender of cities, defender of homes, defender of the traveler, of those far from home, of those who rely on the refuge of civilization; kindly Zeus who watches the world, friend of the fates, giver of good fortune, by your good will are our larders full, our children strong, our minds and bodies  sound and vital; Zeus, from whom all good derives, whose gifts are sought by all, who knows our troubles and our joys, who hears our calls, who answers them with wisdom and with care; oh Zeus, whose wrath falls on the wrong-doer, whose blessings come to those who are fair-minded and good of heart, who stands behind the guest and the stranger, I praise you!

19) I will sing of Zeus, chiefest among the gods and greatest, all-seeing, the lord of all, the fulfiller who whispers words of wisdom to Themis as she sits leaning towards him. Be gracious, all seeing Son of Cronos, most excellent and great.

20) Let Artemis know that your here by saying, “Artemis, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

21) I call to Artemis, fleet-footed bow-woman, roamer of the woodland, wild-willed mistress of beasts, fierce-hearted protector of young girls.

Artemis, daughter of thundering Zeus and blessed Leto, sister of bright Phoebus, the lovely nymphs attend you.

On Delos and in Ephesos your name was spoken with reverence and devotion; in all the lands your temples stood, ever fragrant with sweet incense.

Creatures of the wood gathered around you; the graceful deer, the bear and the boar, all are yours.

Artemis, friend of the hunter and the fisher, friend of the mother and midwives and all small nurslings, friend of maidens, unfettered and free of spirit, far-shooting goddess, goddess of the strong voice whose words of the heart are heard, I call to you.

22) I praise you, Artemis, free-hearted child of Zeus and blessed Leto, courageous goddess who roams the wildwood with silver bow at hand.

Artemis of many names, Artemis of many lands, your temples stood shining and tall, in cities and in villages.

In the long days of summer the maidens dance in your honor; in Brauron were the little she-bears under your care.

Artemis, the mountains are yours to wander, fleet-footed and firm of step; the wilds of the world are dear to you, O guardian of wood and of beast.

Goddess who takes joy in dance and song, companion of the laughing nymphs in all their play, of all young maidens you are the swiftest and the strongest, the fairest and the first, in skill and grace the greatest.

23) Muse, sing of Artemis, sister of the Far-shooter, the virgin who delights in arrows, who was fostered with Apollo. She waters her horses from Meles deep in reeds, and swiftly drives her all-golden chariot through Smyrna to vine-clad Claros where Apollo, god of the silver bow, sits waiting for the far-shooting goddess who delights in arrows.

And so hail to you, Artemis, in my song and to all goddesses as well. Of you first I sing and with you I begin; now that I have begun with you, I will turn to another song.

24) Let Athena know that your here by saying, “Athena, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

25) I call to Athena, clear-eyed daughter of Zeus; from his head you burst forth, all in brilliant armor, a warrior from your first breath, born with all the skill, all the insight, all the guile of an old warlord.

In ancient times were you well honored, goddess; in every town your name was spoken with love and reverence; above all in Athens, that finest of cities, did you receive the greatest devotion.

Bold Athena whose favor falls on the brave and on the clever, who hones the wit of a scholar and quickens the nimble fingers of the artisan, who offers counsel reasoned and reflective, farsighted builder of cities who leads humanity towards concord and community, granter of the gift of civilization, I call to you.

26) Steel-eyed Athena, wisest of goddesses, daughter of thundering Zeus and Metis of good counsel, patron of  great heroes and adventurers, advisor of princes and kings, your favor falls on the bold and the clever, on those who dare and those who tempt the noble Fates.

Athena, weaver of the finest, fairest tapestries, teacher of art and craft to mortal artistans, worker of metals, your soft hands guide the flow of molten ore.

Leader of battles, warrior maid, of tactics and of strategy you know all, of clever trickery and wiles you are the master; with words and wit you may win much, with strength of arm and sharpened sword, at need, you take all contests.

Athena of wisdom, Athena of skills, goddess of the agile mind, for your works I praise you.

27) Of Pallas Athene, guardian of the city, I begin to sing. Dread is she, and with Ares she loves deeds of war, the sack of cities and the shouting of battle. It is she who saves the people as they go out to war and come back.

Hail, goddess, and give us good fortune with happiness!

28) Let Demeter know that your here by saying, “Demeter, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

29) I call to Demeter, great lady of the land, friend of the farmer, sustainer of mankind, daughter of deep-hearted Rhea and wily Kronos, loving mother to rich-tressed Persephone.

In ancient times were you honored by country folk above all others; in all the provinces did men and women pray to you and ask your blessings.

Goddess, we see your hand in rows of golden grain, in heavy-fruited trees, in fields of scarlet poppies blooming amongst the barley, in the passing of seasons, in the fury of a mother wronged.

Demeter, lauded in storied Eleusis, mistress of those cherished mysteries and sacred rites, by your might and your compassion do we endure, do we live our lives.

Demeter, I call to you.

30) Shining Demeter, queen of the fruitful earth, daughter of great-bosomed Rhea of ancient name, mother of Persephone, friend of the farmer, friend of all those who hold hope in their hearts.

You hold in your hands the warm black soil, Demeter, you hold in your hands the lives of men and women.

By your will it is, goddess, that the fields flourish, the trees bear sweet fruit; by your goodness it is that we harvest food enough to feed our families.

Kind you are, Demeter, benevolent one, and yet never should your favor be presumed, for your wrath is such that it could end all lives if such was your desire.

Your gifts are precious, O Demeter, more precious than the gold and jewels that lie beneath the new-sown seeds; your blessings are the air we breathe, the bread we eat.

Blessed goddess, Demeter of the great heart, we than you each day for all you have given us, all we know of life.

31) I begin to sing of rich-haired Demeter, awful goddess, of her and of her daughter lovely Persephone. Hail, goddess! Keep this city safe, and govern my song.

32) Let Poseidon know that your here by saying, “Poseidon, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles (if you know them) and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

 

33) I call to Poseidon, great god of the seas, fond husband of ocean-dwelling Amphitrite, son of ancient Kronos and wild-hearted Rhea, father of noble kings and mighty heroes.

In distant days were you well known; in Crete your name was carved in clay; in Corinth were you honored well, and in all the provinces.

Dark haired Poseidon, you hold in your hands the waters of the world, those briny depths that brought us all into life; that carried mankind to many lands, to gather wealth and wisdom; that nourished our furthest forebears and formed the patterns of our lives.

Poseidon, maker and master of horses, trident-bearer, earth-shaker, lord of the beasts of the deep, lord of the thrashing waves, sea-god, I call to you.

34) Poseidon, lord of the darkest sea-depths, lord of the crashing surf, your hair we with brine, your eyes cold and blue, keen as winter waters, you hold in your hands the life of the sailor, through fair weather or foul you guide ships to safety or ravage them with waves.

Within your domain we live only by your goodness and forbearance; with ease do you lay waste to great cities, do you shake the earth till the works of men crumble.

You raise the four great winds, you hone the rain to a cutting edge, you turn the waters of your realm to cruel ice.

By your might do floods destroy us, Poseidon; yours too is the deadly drought, the hard cracked dirt that signals famine and fear.

Our lives depend on your balance, Poseidon, on your generous heart and open hand.

God of oceans, god of the salt of life, I praise and honor you.

35) I begin to sing about Poseidon, the great god, mover of the earth and fruitless sea, god of the deep who is also lord of Helicon and wide Aegae. A two-fold office the gods alloted you, O Shaker of the Earth, to be a tamer of horses and a Saviour of ships!

Hail, Poseidon, Holder of the Earth, dark-haired lord! O blessed one, be kindly in heart and help those who voyage in ships.

36) Let Asclepius know that your here by saying, “Asclepius, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles (if you know them) and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

37) I call to Asklepios, finest of physicians, son of far-shooting Apollo, known as Paean, student of immortal Cheiron, wisest of centaurs, counselor of heroes.

In Epidaurus were you well honored; many were the supplicants who prayed to you for healing, many were the cures granted, the petitions answered, the heartfelt thanks received by you, O kindly asklepios.

Throughout the land were you known, did men and women beg your blessings; your altars overflowed with their grateful offerings, your temples sheltered those who sought your favor in dreams.

Asklepios, friend of the people, friend of the suffering, soother of pain, healer of ills, restorer of health, good-hearted Asklepios, I call to you.

38) All praise to skillful Asklepios, son of Apollo and bright Koronis, kind-hearted god, friend of men and women.

Your gentle touch eases our pain, O god, your firm hand guides our restoration; you teach us to live well, to care for ourselves, to seek the wisdom of Hygeia, your beloved daughter, good and knowing goddess who turns the minds of men towards wholesome food and drink, and healthful pursuits.

Nimble-fingered one, quick witted one, by your might does the broken bone set, the torn flesh mend, the damaged soul heal.

With your help do we bear any hurt, do we suffer any malady, do we battle any affliction, with strength of will and with steadfast heart: Asklepios, father of physicians, helper of humanity, I praise you, I honor you, and I thank you for your gifts.

39) I begin to sing of Asclepius, son of Apollo and healer of sicknesses. In the Dotian plain fair Coronis, daughter of King of Phlegyas, bare him, a great joy to men, a soother of cruel pangs.

And so hail to you, lord: in my song I make my prayer to you.

40) Let Ares know that your here by saying, “Ares, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting him know that your here. Say his titles (if you know them) and then tell him which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to him. Also let him know of any thing that he’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what he’s granted you and what you’ve offered to him in the past. Now tell him what you intend to give to him and make sure that you have the offerings there.

41) I call to Ares, strong one, swift one, clever one, god of the impulse, god of the moment, god of the hunch and the quick reaction, god of the battle, god of the fight.

Ares, son of thundering Zeus and dark-eyed Hera, few were your temples, few were your shrines, for those who held you dearest had a grave need indeed for your favor–the field of battle was your temple, the blood of the slain a final offerings.

From the north you came, O bold-spirited Ares; in far-flung Thrace you made your home, the Spartans and men of Macedon revered you.

Ares, granter of courage, granter of strength, granter of the will to endure, friend of the wronged and the vengeful, O Ares, I call to you.

42) Ares, bright-armored bearer of spear and shield, son of noble Zeus and wise and watchful Hera, beloved of deep-hearted Aphrodite, father of ear, father of sweet harmony, in all realms no one knows more the depths and heights to which necessity may drive mankind.

Fair of form you are, O Ares, strong of arm and fleet of food, clever in the ways of strife, ever-wary defender of the city gate, granter of the sense that keeps safe the soldier, holder of the hearts of those in direst need.

Dear to you are war dogs and carrion-birds, beasts that feed on blood and carnage, that flourish in the barren fields of battle.

Ares, savior of cities, shaker of spears, bright-helmed one who lends strength to the weak, courage to the fearful, will to the clouded and vengeance to the wronged, I thank you for your gifts, I honor your calling.

43) Ares, exceeding in strength, chariot-rider, golden helmed, doughty of heart, shield bearer, Saviour of cities, harnessed in bronze, strong of arm, unwearying, mighty with the spear, O defense of Olympus, father of warlike Victory, ally of Themis, stern governor of the rebellious, leader of righteous men, sceptered King of manliness, who whirl your fiery sphere among the planets in their sevenfold courses through the aether wherein your blazing steeds ever bear you above the third firmament of heaven; hear me, helper of men, giver of dauntless youth! Shed down a kindly ray from above my life, and strength of war, that I may be able to drive away bitter cowardice from my head and crush down the deceitful impulses of my soul. Restrain also the keen fury of my heart which provokes me to tread the ways of blood curdling strife. Rather, O blessed one, give you me boldness to abide within the harmless laws of peace, avoiding strife and hatred and the violent fiends of death.

44) Let Hecate know that your here by saying, “Hecate, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

45) I call to Hekate, who stands at the crossroads, who stands at the city gate, who stands before each family’s home, to watch and to ward off evil.

Bearer of torches, leader of hounds, holder of keys, daughter of the deep earth and the starry sky, you tread upon the path less traveled; you walk, with certainty and without fear, in the dark night, in the wilderness, along roads most treacherous, among those who skirt the edges of order.

Hekate, friend of women, protector of children, you know the perils of all the worlds, goddess, as each world is your realm to wander.

Thus do you bar the door from all ill, thus do you drive away the baneful and the false.

Hekate, compassionate goddess, I call to you.

45)  I call to you, kind Hekate, watchful daughter of far-seeing Asteria, torch-bearing goddess, night-wanderer, pale and fair as the moonflower.

Hekate of the three ways, goddess of the crossroads, keen-eyed one, you see clearly what others overlook.

Hekate of the three realms, goddess who holds a stake in all the worlds, all within are yours to stir.

Gentle of touch and firm of hand, Hekate, leader of the ghostly train, the barking of dogs marks your passage, the shining of stars lights your path.

Hekate who is the companion of those who walk the bounds of light and dark, I praise and honor you.

46) Hekate Einodia, Trioditis [Trivia], lovely dame, of earthly, watery, and celestial frame, sepulchral, in a saffron veil arrayed, pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade; Perseis, solitary goddess, hail! The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail; in stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen, and drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen; Leader, Nymphe, nurse, on mountains wandering, hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere, and to the herdsman with a favouring mind draw near.

47) Let Hestia know that your here by saying, “Hestia, hear me”  This isn’t a command, this is letting her know that your here. Say her titles (if you know them) and then tell her which offerings, if any, that you’ve made to her. Also let her know of any thing that she’s done for you. It’s a kind reminder that you still remember what she’s granted you and what you’ve offered to her in the past. Now tell her what you intend to give to her and make sure that you have the offerings there.

48) I call to Hestia, gentle one, heart of the home, honored daughter of mighty Kronos and fair Rhea; at first and last born of those ancient Titans you take all first and final offerings.

Peace-loving goddess, tender of Olympos’ flame, in tranquil pursuits you take pleasure.

Hestia, in the arts of the home we find you, in a warm fire and a full larder, in a generous spirit and a soft voice.

Goddess, in every house you hold safe the most profound of intimacies, the substance of family, the essence of society.

Each home a safe haven, each hearthside your temple, each flame, each meal, each child tucked into bed a prayer of gratitude to you, dear goddess.

Hestia, firm-willed one, kind-hearted one, I call to you.

49) Well-honored Hestia, queen of the hearthfire, first among the deathless ones, first are the offerings you receive, first are the blessings you provide.

Hestia, holder of the household, upholder of community, tender of the flame in every home, every city, every place where we gather together to live our lives. First you are in tales long told, elders and youngest child of old Kronos and clever Rhea; first you are in holy rites, first you are in family customs, first to take from simple meals to lavish feasts.

Where bread is broken, where welcome is warm, we know your might.

Oh goddess.

50) Hestia, in the high dwelling of all, both deathless gods and men who walk on earth, you have gained an everlasting abode and highest honor: glorious is your portion and your right. For without you mortals hold no banquet,–where one does not duly pour sweet wine in offering to Hestia both first and last.

And you, slayer of Argus, Son of Zeus and Maia, messenger of the blessed gods, bearer of the golden rod, giver of good, be favorable and help us, you and Hestia, the worshipful and dear. Come and dwell in this glorious house in friendship together; for you two, well knowing the noble actions of men, aid on their wisdom and their strength.

Hail, Daughter of Cronos, and you also, Hermes, bearer of the golden rod! Now I will remember you and another song also.

51) Offering Incense, saying, “I offer this incense, as I’ve done before, in names of the household gods. On this, the first day of the new month (mention anything that they have done for you).

52) Give Food Offering, saying, “I offer this food as a sacrifice, as I’ve done before in the names of the household gods. On this, the first day of the new month (as before, mention anything that they have done. If not, just do a small prayer)

53) Pour libations to the household gods. Remember: Hestia gets first and last libations.

54) Pray to gods.

55) End the ritual by saying, “Hestia, goddess of home and hearth, to you I offer last of all as a pious mortal should. Tend to those whom I love and guard the houses of the pious. As the gods will it, so it shall be.”

It is so!

Dump the entire container that you’ve poured your wine or grape juice into outside and then that ends it.